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Posted on Jun 18, 2013

Sleeping Siesta and The Problem With Money- RTW Life on The Road Financial Travel Tips

Sleeping Siesta and The Problem With Money- RTW Life on The Road Financial Travel Tips

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Money is always a huge question around here. And I love it when readers ask me tough questions so that I can stretch myself to try and give tough answers.  We’re in month 28 and people always assume that we’re super rich, cuz we are! But not necessarily in the ways you would think. We learned how to manage it smartly and even consider to use an ISA to save it as we travel.  We’re not swimming in the mula, we’re swimming in freedom and time, options, and no obligations other than the ones we are most passionate about. That’s how rich we are.

My friend Val Dawson at This Way To Paradise just posted this fable/story on Facebook. My dad used to tell it as a joke. It goes something like this:

Sleeping Siesta

An American goes on his two-week vacation to a small coastal Mexican village. He’s standing at the pier when a small boat with just one fisherman docks. Inside the small boat were several large yellow fin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.

The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”

The American then asked, “Why didn’t you stay out longer and catch more fish?”

The Mexican said, “With this I have more than enough to support my family’s needs.”

The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos, I have a full and busy life.”

The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and could help you. You should spend more time fishing; and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat: With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you would sell directly to the.
processor; eventually opening your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles and eventually New York where you will run your ever-expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied, “15 to 20 years.”

“But what then?” asked the Mexican.

The American laughed and said that’s the best part. “When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich, you would make millions.”

“Millions? Then what?”

The American said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.”

The Problem With Money

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Yeah, that! Our gross habits and our net income don’t fit. Other than that, we’ve had some annoying financial hiccups, nothing as bad as The Hiccup which tore us apart, but others, like the ATM’s didn’t work for a while, Kobi couldn’t use our credit cards, and we’d get an awful exchange rate from someone when we just crossed a border and didn’t have the bearings to know better yet. We’ve managed to push some more money into our IRA funds which makes us ridiculously happy, and as nomads who want easy access to our money, we’re trying to figure out how to better save and find out more about the ISA allowance. If you have any experience with either, let us know, for we’d love to learn about these options that may give us more freedom. We’ll see.

The Flow of Money

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We still spend too much time worrying, and then we relax and see that it just comes to us when we need it, and in all sorts of remarkably, creative ways we never would have imagined. And, you know something funny, even when we were struggling ice cream truck drivers working our way through community college, and even when Kobi made that critical error at that event so far from home, and even when we felt we couldn’t breathe in our lives for stress over money, it always appeared. We always had enough, and we always will. So, I still sometimes stress out, but much less for the Universe is yelling in my face that she will always take me to where I need to go so there’s no point in wasting the energy being worried. I may as well be happy playing games with the kids, playing the guitar and exercising. I may as well live in passion. And so I will. Thank you very much.

Some Super Popular (Or They Should Be) Posts About Money

The Ying Yang Of Living Without

Five Tips to Ensure Cheap But Awesome Family Travel

You Would Die If You Knew How Rich We Were

How Do You Afford Traveling For So Long? Money Saving Tip #28: Other People’s Clothing

10 Nomadic Families Traveling The World, 7 Continents: How They Afford It

How Do You Move From Place to Place Cheaply? Budget Transportation for World Family Travel

Voluntary Frugality

Poverty For Christmas

How Do RTW Family Travelers Plan Their RTW Itinerary?

How to Afford RTW Travel Transportation for Long-Term Family World Travel

Ridiculous Ways To Save Money

How Can A Family of Six Afford Long-Term World Travel? Cheap Rent. The Most Detailed Financial Break Down of Costs Around The World

If I Only Knew Then

Saving Money For Such A Dream

How Cheap Can I Sleep

Only The Very Special, Lucky, Rich, and Perfect (Like Me) Can Travel

Would love your thoughts, on it all. On the joke, the money problems, the Universe bringing us all when we live in passion. All of it. I’m here loving the Philippines.

Gabi

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We’ve written a highly inspirational e-book about money and how you can take these ten steps to make your travel dreams come true. I do hope you will consider spending the $8 and learning/ be reminded of what you can do, starting today, to make your family world travel dreams come true.

Thank you dearly,

Gabi, Kobi, Solai, Dahnya, and Orazi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 Comment

  1. Hi Gabi…just found this post and wanted to comment. That story about the fisherman has always been one of my favorites…I even included it in my book “The Findhorn Book of Practical Spirituality.” It is such a great reminder that most of the time we are searching for the feeling rather than the things that money can buy. Plus I so agree with you that if we can surrender our fears and learn to trust ourselves AND the Universe, all the resources we need will be ours. That has been exactly the experience of both my husband and myself in the last 36 years (with a few hiccups like you). Of course, I do have to express my admiration to you because you did what we have done–BUT you’re doing it with two young children. That is definitely an act of faith and trust. Still, my life continues to affirm that when we set our intentions and work on our consciousness the Universe responds accordingly. Stay the course 🙂

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